Populux Detroit Now Permanently Closed Following Twitter Controversy

Author : Marco Sgalbazzini
July 20, 2016

Populux Detroit Now Permanently Closed Following Twitter Controversy

Populux Detroit

News has just come in that Populux is permanently closing following the Twitter controversy that made headlines two weeks ago. The Detroit nightclub came under fire after its Twitter account was used to send out tweets and retweets criticizing Black Lives Matter, liberals and President Obama for the Dallas shooting that left five police dead on July 7th.

Initially the club announced a temporary closure, claiming that their Twitter account had been hacked and used by an unknown individual to send out the fiery tweets. At that point, the club proceeded to shut down all its social media accounts.

According to the Detroit Free PressPopulux is now permanently closed and set to be replaced by the Magic Stick — the venue that resided in the same space until 15 months ago when Populux first opened. According to Amir Daiza, the longtime promoter and restaurateur who operated Populux, the twitter fiasco— which drew national attention and prompted artists to cancel in protest — was the final straw for a venue already under fire from some corners of the local music community.

“We want to catch the perpetrator,” mentioned Dave Zainea, whose family owns the Majestic complex in Detroit. “We think it was done deliberately to get back at (Populux) management.” According to the Detroit Free Press, a “John Doe” lawsuit was filed Monday in Wayne County Circuit Court, paving the way for a subpoena process that could force Internet providers to divulge names of individuals who accessed the Populux Twitter account that night.

The White Stripes playing the Magic Stick on Sept 10th, 1999

The White Stripes playing the Magic Stick on Sept 10th, 1999

 

It’s clear that all parties concerned deemed the Populux name as unsolvable following the scandal, deciding to bring back the Magic Stick name that for two decades was linked to alternative music and local Detroit-bred rock. The venue will no longer cater to electronic music, and will undergo a make-over until September to ready it for the rock crowd it is set to welcome once it reopens.

According to Zainea, the closure could result in up to $300,000 in lost sales.